Coal Train – BNSF 6134

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While walking with Wendi along the Front Range Trail, I spotted a sandstone outcropping. I thought it would make a good spot to get train photos. When I’m out taking photos, I usually use my 75-300mm lens. It turns out that lens was too long for this spot; I’ll have to go back with a shorter setup next time.

GE ES44AC BNSF 6134 leads an empty unit coal train for Xcel Energy along the trail. BNSF 6134 was paired with BNSF 9333, an EMD SD70ACe.

The long lens gave me an opportunity to get an angle I don’t always get…

A pair of GE ES44ACs (BNSF 6230 and BNSF 6068) bring up the rear.

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5 thoughts on “Coal Train – BNSF 6134

  1. SnapperTrx

    Given your love of trains maybe you would be interested in this engineering marvel, not to far from where I live. It’s the Tehachapi Loop, and its one of the coolest things I have ever seen. The last time we were in the area we visited the rail museum there in town and they had a lot of really cool information on the loop and its creation. If your ever in the area then you should stop by and see it. Tehachapi, land of the four seasons and still, very much, into trains.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tehachapi_Loop

    Some images:
    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=tehachapi+loop&FORM=HDRSC2

    Reply
    1. matt Post author

      Tehachapi Loop is pretty awesome; I can understand why a lot of railfans love going there. I’d like to check it out if I’m ever in that area.

      Something it seems to have going for it rather well is that there almost always seems to be rail traffic there. I often go hours here without seeing anything. These pictures, in fact, were taken after sitting for about an hour with nothing.

      Reply
      1. SnapperTrx

        I can’t attest to the amount of traffic, but I know that through Tehachapi and Bakersfield there has been a number of new oil shipping facilities which have greatly increased the amount of rail traffic in the area. In fact, driving past one of the facilities the other day there were no less than ten long lines of oil tankers (probably twenty long) in place, waiting to be loaded/unloaded. I’ll see if I can get a couple of good shots if I go by there again any time soon. It’s not as exciting as moving trains, but it is pretty impressive.

        Reply
        1. matt Post author

          I take/have taken photos of stopped trains, too. The Colorado Joint line goes to single rail for both north- and southbound traffic, so stopped trains happen a lot here. The upside to that is the opportunities for pictures last longer!

          Reply
  2. Pingback: Kohlenzug — BNSF 6340 – Simplify…

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